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Course #
Course Title
Course Level
Units
ENVS 15
Natural History of the UCSC Campus
Lower Division
2 units
Introduces students to the range of natural species and communities occurring on the UCSC campus. All class time is spent outside, and each week a different area of campus is visited. Course 24 is recommended.
ENVS 17
Curation of Natural History Collections
Lower Division
2 units
Introduction and training in the skills needed to create, manage, and exhibit natural history collections, including plants, insects, fungi, birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians. Enrollment limited to 12.
ENVS 23
The Physical and Chemical Environment
Lower Division
5 units
Provides an overview of the physical and chemical environment of planet Earth. Fundamental chemistry and physics is introduced in the process of learning about Earth in a holistic way. The influence of human societies on the global environment is one focus of discussion. Earth's many "spheres" are explored first: the lithosphere; the atmosphere; the hydrosphere, and the ecosphere. Then global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and several other elements are studied in the context of basic sciences and societal issues. (General Education Code(s): IN.)
ENVS 24
General Ecology
Lower Division
5 units
Covers principles of ecology including limits to species abundances, evolutionary ecology, population dynamics, community interactions and patterns, and ecosystem patterns and dynamics. Prerequisite(s): Applied Mathematics and Statistics 2 or 3 or 6, or MATH 3 or higher; or mathematics placement examination (MPE) score of 300 or higher; or AP Calculus AB exam score of 3 or higher; course 23 recommended as prerequisite to this course. (General Education Code(s): SI, IN.)
ENVS 25
Environmental Policy and Economics
Lower Division
5 units
Introduces the policy and economic dimensions of some pressing environmental challenges. Uses examples from population, water, climate change, and other topics to examine the economic underpinnings of environmental problems, the process of environmental policy-making, and the trade-offs in different policy solutions. (General Education Code(s): PE-E, IS.)
ENVS 65
Introduction to Fresh Water: Processes and Policy
Lower Division
5 units
Introduction to freshwater resources from multiple scientific and policy perspectives. After a review of basic concepts, water issues affecting cities, farms, open space, and multiple-use landscapes are studied. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have previously received credit for course 165. (General Education Code(s): PE-E.)
ENVS 80B
The Ecological Forecast for Global Warming
Lower Division
5 units
A broad overview of the impacts of human activities on the global climate system. Topics include how climate affects the distribution of ecosystems, the influence of global climate change on biodiversity, ecosystem function, and consequences for the human enterprise. (General Education Code(s): PE-E, T7-Natural Sciences or Social Sciences.)
ENVS 100
Ecology and Society
Upper Division
3 units
Introduction to environmental issues in an interdisciplinary matrix. Focuses on three issues at the intersection of ecological questions and social institutions: agroecology and sustainable agriculture; population growth, economic growth, and environmental degradation; and biodiversity conservation and land management. Reviews the important roles of disciplinary abstraction and of the application of that knowledge to context-dependent explanations of environmental problems. Prerequisite(s): course 23 or CHEM 1A; course 24 or BIOE 20C; course 25; and AMS 7/L or ECON 113 or OCEA 90; and one from: ANTH 2, SOCY 1,10,15, PHIL 21,22,24,28, or 80G. Concurrent enrollment in 100L is required.
ENVS 100L
Ecology and Society Writing Laboratory
Upper Division
5 units
Required writing lab accompanying course 100. Students are introduced to writing in different styles and for different audiences typical of the ecosystem-society interface. Course 100 writing assignments are developed, written, and revised in conjunction with the lab. W credit is granted only upon successful completion of course 100. Prerequisite(s): Satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Concurrent enrollment in 100 is required. (General Education Code(s): PR-E.)
ENVS 104A
Introduction to Environmental Field Methods
Upper Division
5 units
A course in the process of field research and monitoring, with emphasis on use of the scientific method; experimental design, data handling, statistical analysis and presentation; and basic field methodologies. Application of basic field skills, including habitat description; methods for sampling plants, animals, soils, water, and microclimate; and observational and manipulative techniques to address ecological, conservation, and management questions. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; concurrent enrollment in course 104L and previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100/L required, or by permission of instructor. (General Education Code(s): W.)
ENVS 104L
Field Methods Laboratory
Upper Division
2 units
Students directly observe elements of natural history and ecological process; design and implement field studies based on lectures; deploy the methods discussed in lectures; and collect data to analyze, interpret, and report in written and oral forms. Concurrent enrollment in course 104A is required.
ENVS 106A
Natural History of Birds
Upper Division
5 units
The evolution, taxonomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, and management of birds. Lecture, discussion, field format. Birds observed in habitats including bay, marsh, meadow, and forest. Evaluations based on a field journal and examinations. Students are billed a materials fee. Prerequisite(s): previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L, or by permission of instructor. Course 105 or Biology 138 are recommended. Enrollment limited to 25.
ENVS 107A
Natural History Field Quarter
Upper Division
5 units
A 15-unit field course that uses California wild lands to develop skills of natural history observation and interpretation. Students gain the ability to identify plants, animals, vegetation types, and landscapes, as well as address the complex issues of preservation and management of these resources. Enrollment by interview. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L; concurrent enrollment in courses 107B and 107C required. Students are billed a materials fee.
ENVS 107B
Natural History Field Quarter
Upper Division
5 units
A 15-unit field course that uses California wild lands to develop skills of natural history observation and interpretation. Students gain the ability to identify plants, animals, vegetation types, and landscapes, as well as address the complex issues of preservation and management of these resources. Enrollment by interview. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L; concurrent enrollment in courses 107A and 107C required.
ENVS 107C
Natural History Field Quarter
Upper Division
5 units
A 15-unit field course that uses California wild lands to develop skills of natural history observation and interpretation. Students gain the ability to identify plants, animals, vegetation types, and landscapes, as well as address the complex issues of preservation and management of these resources. Enrollment by interview. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L; concurrent enrollment in courses 107A and 107B required.
ENVS 108
General Entomology
Upper Division
5 units
Introduction to entomology including anatomy, physiology, systematics, evolution, behavior, and reproduction of the world's most diverse group of organisms. These topics are illustrated in several contexts, from the importance of insects as disease vectors to the historical and contemporary uses of insects by humans. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor. Offered in alternate academic years.
ENVS 108L
General Entomology Laboratory
Upper Division
3 units
Laboratory sections are devoted to the identification of insects. Individual collections representing 15 orders, sight identification of 60 families, and use of taxonomic keys for positive designations required. Concurrent enrollment in course 108 is required. Offered in alternate academic years.
ENVS 109A
Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Ecological Field Methods
Upper Division
5 units
An intensive, on-site learning experience in terrestrial field ecology and conservation, using the University of California Natural Reserves and other natural areas. Students study advance concepts in ecology, conservation, and field methods for four weeks, then experience total immersion in field research at the UC Natural Reserves and other natural areas. Lectures, field experiments, writing assignments, and computer exercises familiarize students with research methods, study design, statistical approaches, and analytical tools for ecological research. Students complete and communicate the results of short field projects in ecology, learn the natural history of the flora and fauna of California, and plan and execute a significant, independent field-research study at the end of the quarter. Enrollment by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, 24, 100; and AMS 7 and 7L. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151B-C-D or ENVS 109B-C-D is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, 150L, ENVS 104A or 196A. (Also offered as Biology:Ecology & Evolutionary 151A. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.)
ENVS 109B
Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Ecological Field Methods Laboratory
Upper Division
5 units
Field-oriented course in ecological research. Combines overview of methodologies and approaches to field research with practical field studies. Students complete field projects in ecology and also learn the natural history of the flora and fauna of California. Students are billed a materials fee. Enrollment by application. Prerequisite(s): Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements; BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, 24, 100; and AMS 7 and 7L. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151A-C-D or ENVS 109A-C-D is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, 150L, ENVS 104A or 196A. (Also offered as Biology:Ecology & Evolutionary 151B. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.) (General Education Code(s): W.)
ENVS 109C
Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Functions and Processes of Terrestrial Ecosystems
Upper Division
5 units
From lectures and discussion of terrestrial community and ecosystem ecology, students work individually or in small groups to present an idea for a project, review relevant literature, develop a research question/hypothesis, design and perform an experiment, collect and analyze data, and write a report. The instructor evaluates the feasibility of each student's project before it begins. Enrollment by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, 24, 100; and AMS 7 and 7L. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151A-B-D or ENVS 109A-B-D is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, 150L, ENVS 104A or 196A. (Also offered as Biology:Ecology & Evolutionary 151C. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.)
ENVS 109D
Ecology and Conservation in Practice Supercourse: Conservation in Practice
Upper Division
4 units
Focuses on current issues in environmental and conservation biology and the emerging field methods used to address them. From field-oriented lectures about current issues in environmental and conservation biology, students pursue research project as individuals and small groups to develop hands-on experience with field skills in conservation research and resource management. Enrollment by application. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 20A, BIOE 20B, BIOE 20C or ENVS 23, 24, 100; and AMS 7 and 7L. Concurrent enrollment in BIOE 151A-B-C or ENVS 109A-B-C is required. Satisfies the senior exit requirement for biological sciences majors and satisfies the senior exit requirement for environmental studies majors by prior approval. Students cannot receive credit for this course and BIOE 150, 150L, ENVS 104A or 196A. (Also offered as Biology:Ecology & Evolutionary 151D. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.)
ENVS 110
Institutions, the Environment, and Economic Systems
Upper Division
5 units
Debate about environmental policy is often couched in economic terms. Environmental issues have become questions of political economy, as they influence international and domestic policy and reflect on the functioning of the market system. Examines the assumptions and implications of alternative approaches to political economy, as these pertain to questions of environmental policy and political institutions. Prerequisite(s): previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 115A
Geographic Information Systems and Environmental Applications
Upper Division
5 units
Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) as the technology of processing spatial data, including input, storage and retrieval; manipulation and analysis; reporting and interpretation. Emphasizes GIS as a decision support system for environmental and social problem solving, using basic model building, experimental design, and database management. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 215A. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in course 115L and 100/L, or permission of instructor. Course in computer science, Earth science, math, or geography recommended.
ENVS 115L
Exercises in Geographic Information Systems
Upper Division
2 units
Exercises in Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing that demonstrate the development of digital geographic data. Students gain hands-on experience with developing datasets, using imagery to create GIS layers, performing spatial analysis, and utilizing GPS technology. Emphasis placed on environmental applications. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 215L. Students are billed a materials fee. Concurrent enrollment in course 115A is required.
ENVS 120
Conservation Biology
Upper Division
5 units
Introduces biological and anthropogenic influences on the diversity and scarcity of organisms. Explores the mathematical models and research tools that provide the foundation for many conservation and management decisions regarding endangered and/or declining species. Topics explored in the context of various examples of conservation decision-making in the real world. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 122
Tropical Ecology and Conservation
Upper Division
5 units
An introduction to the ecological processes, principles, and players of tropical ecosystems, and to conservation issues facing tropical American forests. We will look at how tropical ecosystems work, roles of humans in shaping them, and current conservation opportunities and dilemmas. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L is required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 123
Animal Ecology and Conservation
Upper Division
5 units
Advanced course in animal ecology and conservation focusing on the ecology, behavior, biogeography, and evolution of vertebrates. Prerequisite(s): course 120. Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required; or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 125
Ecosystems of California
Upper Division
5 units
A survey of the diversity, structure, and functioning of California's ecosystems through time and the ways they have influenced and responded to human activities and stewardship. Topics include: ecosystem drivers such as climate, soils, and land-use history; human and ecological prehistory; comparative marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystem dynamics; and managed ecosystems such as range, fisheries, and agriculture. (Also offered as Biology:Ecology & Evolutionary 125. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.) Prerequisite(s): previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100/100L. Enrollment restricted to environmental studies majors and combined majors. (General Education Code(s): PE-E.)
ENVS 129
Integrated Pest Management
Upper Division
5 units
Provides an extensive coverage of applied ecology, pest control technology, and the social, political, and economic factors regulating the ideologies and practice of pest management. Topics include agroecosystem design and population regulation of insects, weeds, vertebrates, and pathogens; field monitoring, chemical and biological control; economic thresholds, decision-making processes, and the role of agribusiness. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 129L
Integrated Pest Management Laboratory
Upper Division
2 units
Field trips and field exercises that demonstrate the practice of integrated pest management techniques. Individual and group projects provide hands-on experience with field sampling techniques, pest identification, recognition of biological control agents, experimental design, interview techniques, data interpretation and field report writing. Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment in course 129.
ENVS 130A
Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture
Upper Division
5 units
Ecological concepts and principles are applied to the design and management of sustainable agroecosystems. Alternatives for agriculture are discussed in terms of ecosystem structure and function. A weekly three-hour lab is required. Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in course 130L and previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 130B
Principles of Sustainable Agriculture
Upper Division
5 units
Agricultural sustainability is examined as a complex set of interactions between ecological, social, and economic components of an agroecosystem. Case studies are drawn from issues facing current U.S. agriculture and a basis for formulating policy for change that ensures sustainability is developed. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 130C
Field Experiences in Agroecology and Sustainable Food
Upper Division
5 units
Research and practice in agroecology and sustainable food systems. Students gain multidimensional understanding of agroecology through study at the UCSC farm, guest speakers, field trips, and interdisciplinary readings. Students participate in research projects and learn about methods, and study design and statistical analysis. Prerequisite(s): previous or concurrent enrollment in course 100/100L. Enrollment limited to 35.
ENVS 130L
Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture Laboratory
Upper Division
2 units
Laboratory and field exercises to train in the analysis of ecological processes in agricultural systems, with a focus on the quantification of ecological sustainability. Experimental design, analysis, and data interpretation are emphasized. Students are billed a materials fee. Concurrent enrollment in course 130A is required.
ENVS 131
Insect Ecology
Upper Division
5 units
Advanced course in ecology featuring insect-plant interactions such as herbivory, pollination, and the effects of plants on insect population dynamics. Lectures emphasize current controversies in ecological theory and relate theory to application. Prerequisite(s): previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor. Offered in alternate academic years.
ENVS 133
Agroecology Practicum
Upper Division
5 units
Lectures and demonstrations are combined with field applications to give students direct experience and knowledge of sustainable agriculture and horticulture practices and principles. UCSC Farm and Garden are the living laboratories for testing agroecological principles. Emphasis is placed on small-farm systems. May be applied to major only once. Students are billed a materials fee. Prerequisite(s): courses 130A and 130L and previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.
ENVS 138
Field Ethnobotany
Upper Division
5 units
Lectures, laboratory, and fieldwork examine field botany from a human ecology perspective. Students have the opportunity to learn the skills of field botany and plant identification through the study of plants that are of major significance for human cultures. The emphasis of field skills is on applications to sustainable management of natural resources. Prerequisite(s): courses 130A and 130L, or by permission of instructor. Concurrent enrollment in course 138L required.
ENVS 140
National Environmental Policy
Upper Division
5 units
An overview of all major federal environmental policy domains. Analyzes political, social, economic, and other forces influencing federal (and some state) public policy responses to land use, natural resources, pollution, and conservation dilemmas. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 140L
National Environmental Policy Field Studies Laboratory
Upper Division
2 units
Students travel to waste-management facilities and environmental agencies around the San Francisco and Monterey Bay regions. Laboratory assignments include: facility profiles and policy-options memos related to each facility. Enrollment restricted to environmental studies majors, and environmental studies/economics, environmental studies/biology, or environmental studies/Earth sciences combined majors. Concurrent enrollment in course 140 is required. Enrollment limited to 24.
ENVS 141
Ecological Economics
Upper Division
5 units
Application of economic analysis to natural resource policy and management. Topics include welfare economics, property rights and externalities, natural resource valuation, exhaustible and renewable resources, and sustainable development. Prerequisite(s): Economics 1 is strongly recommended as preparation. Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L is required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 142
Energy Politics and Policy
Upper Division
5 units
Explores the social and environmental dimensions of energy production and consumption. Provides an overview of the tools to evaluate a new clean-energy economy and its wider political and economic implications. Students study assessment tools, such as risk assessment, material energy balances, and life-cycle assessment. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 143
Sustainable Development: Economy, Policy, and Environment
Upper Division
5 units
Considers whether and how global poverty can be alleviated without irreparably damaging the environment. Examines interactions among population, economic growth, poverty, global consumption ethos, property rights systems, global economy, state capacity, and environmental damage. Scrutinizes impact of various developmental strategies adopted during the past 50 years on poverty, governance, and the environment. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 146
Water Quality: Policy, Regulation, and Management
Upper Division
5 units
Building on prior preparation, the course provides an in-depth examination of American water-quality policy, regulation and management. In addition to a detailed understanding of pollutant-discharge permitting, students learn about nonpoint source water pollution and its regulatory remedies. Prerequisite(s): course 100/L, and 140 or 149 or 150 or 165. (General Education Code(s): PE-E.)
ENVS 147
Environmental Inequality/Environmental Justice
Upper Division
5 units
Reviews research on race, class, and differential exposure to environmental hazards. Shows how environmental inequality has, from the start, been an essential feature of modernity. Situates the environmental-justice movement in the history of American environmentalism. Students cannot receive credit for this course and Sociology 185. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor. (General Education Code(s): ER.)
ENVS 149
Environmental Law and Policy
Upper Division
5 units
Surveys a wide range of topics in environmental law, including state and federal jurisdiction, administrative law, separation of powers, state and local land use regulation, public land and resource management, pollution control, and private rights and remedies. Students read a large number of judicial cases and other legal documents. (Also offered as Legal Studies 149. Students cannot receive credit for both courses.) Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 150
Coastal and Marine Policy
Upper Division
5 units
Introduces and analyzes the history, design, implementation, and effectiveness of key legal and institutional frameworks that govern the use and stewardship of coastal and marine areas and resources. Primary focus is on the U.S., although attention is also devoted to international laws and institutions targeting major transboundary issues like marine pollution and management of migratory fish stocks. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 151
Environmental Assessment
Upper Division
5 units
Introduction to California land use planning law and practice, and the theory, practice, and public policy aspects of environmental assessment, using the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) as a model. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and other environmental and planning legislation also considered. Covers elements of State law and regulations, environmental impact assessment requirements, and practical procedures for preparing and evaluating CEQA documents, with case studies that exemplify legal, regulatory and public policy and practice aspects of the assessment process. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 154
Amazonian Cultures and Conservation
Upper Division
5 units
Overview of human societies in the Amazon from both a historical and contemporary perspective. Topics include indigenous resource management, deforestation, conservation politics, culture, and economic change. Prerequisite(s): previous or concurrent enrollment in course 100 and 100L, or permission of instructor. (General Education Code(s): CC, E.)
ENVS 156
Environmental Action through Writing
Upper Division
5 units
Guided practice in writing skills useful to environmental activists. Assignments emphasize thinking quickly, revising adeptly, researching resourcefully, and tempering powerful passions with careful arguments. Toward the development of effective individual voices, students read each other's drafts as well as the published work of established writers. Enrollment priority will be given to students who have not taken course 157. Prerequisite(s):satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements and previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor. (General Education Code(s): W.)
ENVS 157
Writing in the Natural Sciences
Upper Division
5 units
Guided practice in writing effectively about science and natural history for a variety of audiences. Assignments emphasize reporting first-hand observations, explaining processes and phenomena, understanding scientific papers, and writing about scientific and technical subjects for a general audience. Enrollment priority will be given to students who have not taken course 156. Prerequisite(s): satisfaction of the Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements and previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100/L required, or by permission of instructor. (General Education Code(s): W.)
ENVS 158
Political Ecology and Social Change
Upper Division
5 units
The object is to provide a rigorous grounding in the method of political ecology and to demonstrate how this approach has been used in environmental analysis and problem solving by environmental social movements. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L is required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 159
Nature Literature
Upper Division
5 units
Introduction to 19th- and 20th-century American writers who have influenced our understanding of humans' place in the natural world. Readings include original works as well as biographical and critical texts. Discussions, field trips, and writing assignments emphasize active learning. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 160
Restoration Ecology
Upper Division
5 units
A multidisciplinary overview of restoring degraded ecosystems. Among the topics addressed are linkages between ecological principles and restoration, planning and implementing restoration projects, evaluating restoration success, and case studies of restoration of specific ecosystem types. Participation in one work day is required. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L is required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 161A
Soils and Plant Nutrition
Upper Division
5 units
Provides fundamentals of soils and plant nutrition. The physical, biological, and chemical components of soils are investigated in relation to their ecological functions, fertility to plants, and sustainable management. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 161L
Soils and Plant Nutrition Laboratory
Upper Division
2 units
Practice analytical techniques for evaluation of physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Grow plants to observe some typical symptoms of plant nutrient deficiencies. Students are billed a materials fee. Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in course 161A is required.
ENVS 162
Plant Physiological Ecology
Upper Division
5 units
Describes how the environment affects plants through the linkages between water, energy, nutrients, photosynthesis, and plant growth. Demonstrates how plant recruitment, survival, and reproduction affect conservation and agriculture. Prior coursework in ecology and/or plant physiology is recommended. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 162L
Plant Physiological Ecology Laboratory
Upper Division
2 units
Introduces techniques for the study of plant interactions with the physical environment. Examines the role of stress on energy budgets, water relations, photosynthesis, and reproductive allocation. Emphasizes experimental design, field techniques, and instrumentation during field trips to local chaparral and grassland ecosystems. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 163
Plant Disease Ecology
Upper Division
5 units
Introduction to ecological roles of plant diseases, including their importance in regulating plant population dynamics, community diversity, and system function in natural ecosystems; considerations of plant diseases in conservation ecology; and ecological approaches to managing diseases in agroecosystems. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 263. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 163L
Plant Disease Ecology Lab
Upper Division
2 units
Introduction to techniques for studying plant diseases, including detection, isolation, cultivation, and identification of important groups of plant pathogens, completing Koch's postulates; diseases assessment techniques; experimental manipulation of plant-pathogen systems; and basic epidemiological tools. One field trip required. Prerequisite(s): concurrent enrollment in course 163 required.
ENVS 165
Freshwater Issues and Policy
Upper Division
5 units
Concepts, vocabulary, and skills necessary to the analysis of freshwater issues are introduced from hydrology, ecology, law, economics, engineering, and other disciplines. The skills are then applied to case studies involving local, state, and international freshwater conflicts and crises. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L is required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 166
Agroecosystem Analysis and Watershed Management
Upper Division
5 units
Explores a range of approaches to examine agroecosystem function, watershed management, and concepts of sustainability. Uses a combination of lecture, demonstration, field work, and field trips to illustrate approaches to analysis of managed ecosystems behavior and the integration of biophysical and socio-political knowledge to aid in watershed management. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor; and course 130A or 130B or 129 or 133 or 160 or 167.
ENVS 167
Freshwater and Wetland Ecology
Upper Division
5 units
Field and lecture course teaches the physical and biological patterns and processes in freshwater and wetland systems, primarily focusing on Central Coast systems from headwaters to coastal marshes. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 167L
Freshwater and Wetland Ecology Lab
Upper Division
2 units
Provides basic skills to assess chemical, biological, and physical characteristics of freshwater creeks, rivers, and wetlands. These skills are needed in environmental consulting, municipal agencies engaging in water management or impacts on water, and regulatory agencies. Relies on methods in geomorphology, biogeochemistry, hydrology, and field biology. Students are billed a materials fee. Concurrent enrollment in course 167 is required.
ENVS 168
Biogeochemistry and the Global Environment
Upper Division
5 units
Studies biogeochemical cycles and related environmental issues such as global environmental change, eutrophication, ecosystem degradation, and agricultural sustainability. Discusses transformation and movement of major nutrient elements in context of watershed ecology and societal implications. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 268. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 169
Climate Change Ecology
Upper Division
5 units
Advanced topics in atmospheric science and ecological theory. Topics include impacts on biodiversity, carbon sequestration, sustainable agriculture, and innovative solutions. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 40.
ENVS 170
Agriculture and Climate Change
Upper Division
5 units
Agriculture contributes to and is affected by climate change. Through lectures and field trips, this course covers the impacts on crops and livestock; climate adaptation strategies in the United States and internationally; and agricultural policy responses to climate change. Prerequisite(s): previous or concurrent enrollment in course 100/100L. Enrollment limited to 35.
ENVS 171
Topics in Environmental Studies
Upper Division
5 units
Readings and discussions of primary literature on a current environmental topic. Emphasizes experiential learning and research. The topics vary; consult current course listings. Prerequisite(s): courses 100 and 100L, or by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.
ENVS 172
Environmental Risks and Public Policy
Upper Division
5 units
Introduces students to the dilemmas in public policy relating to the management of environmental risks, and discusses their underlying philosophical underpinnings. Explores emergent alternatives, such as the precautionary principle and alternatives assessment, and examines the relationship between experts and the lay public in public controversies. (Formerly Science, Policy, and the Environment.) Prerequisite(s): previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor. (General Education Code(s): W.)
ENVS 173
An Introduction to World Environmental History
Upper Division
5 units
Introduces students to some of the central issues in world environmental history such as: human attitudes toward the natural environment; the role of human societies, their institutions and technologies in changing the face of the earth; and the historical impact of environmental and developmental policies on race, class, and gender differences in a variety of human communities across the world. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 176
Vulnerability, Complex Systems, and Disasters
Upper Division
5 units
Introduces students to the research on the relationship between vulnerability and disasters, and on complex systems including hazardous technologies. Explores perspectives on disasters in the literature on political ecology. Also examines relevant work of organizational sociology, and related fields including normal accident and high reliability organizational theories. Prerequisite(s): Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L or by permission of the instructor. (General Education Code(s): PE-T.)
ENVS 177
Teaching Environmental Education
Upper Division
5 units
Designed for environmental studies majors interested in teaching environmental education in the K-12 school system. Students investigate incorporation of environmental education in the classroom; design an environmental education school project; and are placed in a school where they observe environmental education in practice. Prerequisite(s): previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L required, or by permission of instructor.
ENVS 179
Environmental Interpretation
Upper Division
5 units
A field course in theory and practice of environmental interpretation in parks, museums, and school programs with special attention to local natural history and children. Students will work to define their own interpretive philosophy, skills, and style. A background in natural history and/or experience working with children is recommended. Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in course 184 is required. Previous or concurrent enrollment in courses 100 and 100L is required, or by permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.
ENVS 189
Environmental Studies Research Seminar
Upper Division
1 units
Research seminars presented weekly throughout the year by environmental studies faculty, visiting scholars, and graduate students. Students discuss content and methodology of research presented following each seminar. Students write critiques of some seminars.
ENVS 190
Capstone Course: Environmental Problem Solving
Upper Division
5 units
A synthetic course that draws on the knowledge and skills students bring from other courses in the major. Focuses on written and oral individual and group projects in which students must take the initiative. Emphasizes developing skills critical for students in their future careers. Prerequisite(s): course 100; Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements. Enrollment restricted to senior environmental studies majors and the combined majors with Earth sciences, biology, and economics.
ENVS 191F
Community and Agroecology Seminar
Upper Division
2 units
Interdisciplinary two-credit seminar designed for upper-division students who want to become involved in PICA (Program in Community and Agroecology) and to explore concepts of community and agroecology as they relate to sustainability. Also emphasizes development of leadership skills. Specific topics and readings change each quarter. Prerequisite(s): course 91F, 130A, 130B, 133, or equivalent experience. Enrollment limited to 25. May be repeated for credit.
ENVS 192
Directed Student Teaching
Upper Division
5 units
Teaching a lower-division seminar. (See course 42.) Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing; permission of environmental studies faculty member and chairperson of department.
ENVS 194
Teaching Environmental Studies
Upper Division
5 units
This provides an opportunity to participate in the preparation and teaching of introductory environmental studies courses. Students will have significant responsibility in leading discussion sections. Students submit petition to sponsoring agency.
ENVS 196
Senior Seminar
Upper Division
5 units
Readings and discussions of primary literature on a current environmental studies topic. Field or literature-based research projects (individual or group) writing multiple drafts resulting in a final paper. Topics vary yearly; consult current course listings. Enrollment by application with selection based on appropriate background and academic performance and by consent of instructor. Satisfies senior comprehensive requirement. Enrollment restricted to senior environmental studies majors; senior environmental studies/biology combined majors; senior environmental studies / Earth sciences combined majors; and senior environmental studies /economics combined majors. Prerequisite(s): Entry Level Writing and Composition requirements.
ENVS 201A
Keywords and Concepts: Geography and Ecology
Graduate
5 units
Exploration of keywords and concepts that underlie interdisciplinary work in environmental studies through lectures, directed readings, and discussion. Modules include resonant concepts in ecology and society; ecology and evolution; environment and development; the global environment and society; agroecology and conservation biology. (Formerly Keywords and Concepts.) Enrollment restricted to graduate students.
ENVS 201B
Keywords and Concepts: Biogeochemistry and Environmental Policy
Graduate
5 units
Exploration of the keywords and concepts that underlie interdisciplinary work in environmental studies through lectures, directed readings, and discussion. Modules include resonant concepts in economics and public policy, biogeochemistry, and global change. (Formerly Keywords and Concepts.) Enrollment restricted to graduate students.
ENVS 201M
Developing Research Proposals
Graduate
2 units
Offers graduate students the opportunity to become familiar with the research expertise of the faculty in the Environmental Studies department. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.
ENVS 201N
Interdisciplinary Research Design in Environmental Studies
Graduate
5 units
Provides students with opportunities to learn research protocols, practices, and methods used in environmental studies. Combination of lectures, reading, practical exercises, and short projects used to explore how these methods can best be incorporated into interdisciplinary research designs. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.
ENVS 210
Political Ecological Thought and Environment
Graduate
5 units
Provides an introduction to social scientific analyses of the relationships between capitalistic development and the environment in the late 20th century. It has a dual purpose: First, to develop a contemporary historical understanding and sensibility of how economic change, new institutional configurations, and world scale processes are shaping interactions with the environment. Second, to examine some recent political social theoretical perspectives on nature-society relations and radical environmental and social movements. Enrollment restricted to graduate students in environmental studies.
ENVS 215A
Geographic Information Systems and Environmental Applications
Graduate
5 units
Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) as the technology of processing spatial data, including input, storage and retrieval; manipulation and analysis; reporting and interpretation. Emphasizes GIS as a decision support system for environmental and social problem solving, using basic model building, experimental design, and database management. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 115A. Concurrent enrollment in course 215L is required. Enrollment restricted to environmental studies graduates students.
ENVS 215L
Exercises in Geographic Information Systems
Graduate
2 units
Exercises in Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing that demonstrate the development of digital geographic data. Students gain hands-on experience with developing datasets, using imagery to create GIS layers, performing spatial analysis, and utilizing GPS technology. Emphasis placed on environmental applications. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 115L. Students are billed a materials fee. Concurrent enrollment in course 215A is required. Enrollment restricted to environmental studies graduate students.
ENVS 220
Conservation Biology
Graduate
5 units
The principles of conservation biology, including a review of the core disciplines of demography, population genetics, island biogeography, and community ecology and discussion of area and edge effects, population viability, and ecosystem issues related to the maintenance of biological diversity, especially in fragmented landscapes. Enrollment restricted to environmental studies graduate students.
ENVS 230
Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture
Graduate
5 units
The application of ecological concepts and principles to the design and management of agricultural systems. The long-term goal of sustainable agroecosystems is examined in economic, social, and ecological contexts. Enrollment restricted to environmental studies graduate students.
ENVS 235
Social Theories of Nature
Graduate
5 units
Intensive reading and discussion seminar on the treatment of nature in social theory. Focuses on major recent works which examine nature in social theory, in themselves, and in the context of the intellectual history of development of disciplinary discourses about nature. Students write critical reviews of assigned books and a research paper situating a particular book within its intellectual tradition. Prerequisite(s): interview with instructor to determine preparedness. May be repeated for credit.
ENVS 240
Public Policy and Conservation
Graduate
5 units
Introduction to political and economic approaches to policy analysis, with particular reference to natural resource scarcity, property rights, and environmental conservation. Case studies apply economic and policy process concepts to the management of public lands, biodiversity, and renewable resources. Enrollment restricted to environmental studies graduate students.
ENVS 247
Regional Approaches to Environmental Policy
Graduate
5 units
A research seminar combining theoretical issues in democratic theory, political economy, and planning with emerging concepts of bioregionalism. The focus is on institutional, scientific, and political innovations in managing the environment. Students evaluate current and historical proposals to regionalize environmental policy in the U.S. Enrollment restricted to environmental studies graduate students.
ENVS 263
Plant Disease Ecology
Graduate
5 units
Introduction to ecological roles of plant diseases, including their importance in regulating plant populations dynamics, community diversity and system function in natural ecosystems, considerations of plant diseases in conservation ecology, and ecological approaches to managing diseases in agroecosystems. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 163. Prerequisite(s): one ecology course. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.
ENVS 268
Biogeochemistry and the Global Environment
Graduate
5 units
Studies biogeochemical cycles and related environmental issues such as global environmental change, eutrophication, ecosystem degradation, and agricultural sustainabilty. Discusses transformation and movement of major nutrient elements in context of watershed ecology and societal implications. Students cannot receive credit for this course and course 168. Enrollment restricted to environmental studies graduate students.
ENVS 271
Valuing the Environment
Graduate
5 units
Intensive seminar examining the normative underpinnings of environmental values. Draws on tools from analytical, ethical, and political philosophy to develop normative arguments concerning environmental inequality and justice, environmental preservation, and risk evaluation. Involves team projects in which students develop cases on controversial contemporary issues such as biotechnology. Prerequisite(s): interview only. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. May be repeated for credit.
ENVS 272
Qualitative Field Methods
Graduate
5 units
Introduces qualitative research approaches in environmental studies. Focuses on philosophies of science, epistemological debates, and specific approaches to qualitative methods. Course components include: field safety, research ethics, human subjects, training, research design and sampling, field observation and ethnographies, key informants, field notes, focus groups, oral histories, narrative research, archival research, questionnaires, discourse analysis, participatory research, and qualitative data analysis techniques. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.
ENVS 280
Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies
Graduate
5 units
Intensive research seminar, including reading and critique of primary research literature and research in progress. Topics vary and are announced in advance; students should consult with faculty prior to enrolling. Enrollment by permission of instructor. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. May be repeated for credit.
ENVS 283
Environmental Studies Internship
Graduate
5 units
Graduate level internship focuses on integrating interdisciplinary academic theory with practical, specialized experience in a professional setting. Course intended for environmental studies graduate students; students must complete paperwork and meet with coordinator prior to first day of instruction.
ENVS 290
Interdisciplinary Research Seminar
Graduate
2 units
Research seminars presented weekly throughout the year by environmental studies and affiliated faculty, by visiting scholars, and by graduate students. Students discuss the content and methodology of research presented following each seminar. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. May be repeated for credit.
ENVS 290L
Graduate Research Seminar
Graduate
2 units
Graduate student presentations of doctoral research proposals, dissertation work-in-progress, grant applications, and conference papers. This weekly laboratory meeting seeks to develop professional skills, teach constructive criticism, and foster effective discussion among peers. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.
ENVS 291
Advanced Readings in Environmental Studies
Graduate
3 units
Focusing on a recently published volume or on a topic of current interest, this seminar requires a rigorous analysis of the principles and methods employed in the four core areas of the program: sustainable agriculture and agro-ecology; conservation biology; environmental policy analysis; and political economy. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. May be repeated for credit.
ENVS 291C
Advanced Readings in Risk and Public Policy
Graduate
3 units
Advanced readings and research on environmental risk and public policy. Explores environmental decision making given the question of the burden of proof and scientific uncertainty and grapples, in an advanced manner, with emergent policy alternatives, such as the precautionary principle. Also offered as course 281C for 5 credits. Prerequisite(s): course 172 or equivalent work demonstrated by an interview. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. May be repeated for credit.
ENVS 291D
Advanced Readings in Tropical Ecology, Agriculture, and Development
Graduate
3 units
Analyzes recent publications in ecology, conservation, agroecology, and development in tropical and subtropical regions, particularly Latin America. Discussions place special emphasis on integration across natural and social science disciplines to address issues of sustainability in tropical regions. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.
ENVS 291M
Advanced Readings in Biogeochemistry
Graduate
3 units
Course consists of three parts: fundamental biogeochemistry of the Earth, global cycles of nutrient elements, and societal and scientific issues of global change. Class activities include (1) presentation of summary statements based on reading assignments; (2) discussion of theories, concepts, methodologies, and applications; (3) computer simulation and modeling of elemental cycles using STELLA; and (4) integration of scientific information on global change with social issues by writing. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.
ENVS 291P
Advanced Readings in Environmental History and Anthropology
Graduate
3 units
Course of readings systematically surveying the theoretical contributions of the disciplines of environmental history, historical ecology, environmental anthropology, and geography. After an overview of the evolution of 20th-century thought on the relationship between environment and culture as seen through the lenses of these disciplines, explores emerging research hybrids and new research frontiers. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.
ENVS 292
Topics in Research in Environmental Studies
Graduate
2 units
Seminar in which students give critically evaluated presentations regarding current research in environmental studies and issues in research design. Students should consult with faculty prior to enrolling. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. May be repeated for credit.